Kirra Jamison – Abstract Paintings

Abstract paintings by Kirra Jamison

Kirra Jamison cultivates ideas. Initial kernels of intuition germinate into lines, forms and patterns that branch and weave and interlay the picture plane with snatches of narrative. Floating amongst the fragments of decorative motif and patterning, vignettes of everyday experience emerge and inveigle the viewer with abundant possibilities of meaning. Harmonious or chaotic, repeated or disrupted, Jamison’s use of patterns and images dismantles cultural boundaries, blurring the divide between high and low art, the East and the West, the past and the present. She exhibits regularly in solo and group exhibitions, and her work is represented in private and corporate collections, including Artbank, KPMG, Microsoft and the Mater Hospital.

Kirra Jamison’s Website

Gregory Thielker – Under the Unminding Sky

Gregory Thielker

Gregory Thielker uses painting and drawing to investigate the conception of site through observation and memory.  His hyper-realistic work connects to specific places and calls into question the way recognition and narrative can often sway understanding and perception.  He employs graphic materials, such as oil paint and graphite, which are often married with conceptual methods to bring the artist’s role into relief. Below a selection of stunning paintings from the artist:

Gregory Thielker’s Website
Gregory Thielker on Instagram
Gregory Thielker on Tumblr

Erik Olson – New Portraits

Erik Olson

Erik Olson paints portraits of his friends. He uses a loaded brush and applies saturated color, creating fractal like shifting planes, building a discontinuity of space and structure. In the process, the likeness and psychology of the sitter remains inexplicably unharmed. The surfaces are composed of thinly applied fields of color and thick loaded-up brushstrokes. The elements of the surfaces seem to be moving in multiple directions simultaneously. It is as if they are spinning through space being formed tectonically by their own gravitational pull while opposing rotational forces are ripping them apart.

Erik Olson’s Website